V.A.C. VERAFLOTM Therapy

With V.A.C. VERAFLO™ Instillation Therapy, you have the best of both worlds: the benefits of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) and instillation with dwell time (NPWTi-d). Having the ability to choose and customize the volume and frequency of instillation of topical wound solutions gives you the opportunity to explore new areas in the management of complex wounds.

Explore this website to learn how you can provide the benefits of V.A.C. VERAFLO™ Therapy for your patients.

Instillation with dwell time (NPWTi-d):

A controlled, automated process in which instilled topical wound solution is slowly introduced into the wound and remains in the wound bed for a defined period of time before being removed by applying negative pressure.

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Learn about
V.A.C. VERAFLO™ Therapy
from nurses like you!

If you know how to apply V.A.C.® Therapy, you can just as easily learn how to apply V.A.C. VERAFLO™ Therapy. Watch our series of videos from nurse educators Susan Mendez-Eastman, RN, CWCN, CPSN ("Sue") and Melissa McKanna, RN (“Missy”) to start learning.

Let's talk about V.A.C. VERAFLO™ Therapy dressing selection.

What's the solution for figuring out the ideal topical wound solution to use?

Tips & Techniques Tips & Techniques

Tips and techniques for applying V.A.C. VERAFLO™ Therapy

Foot wounds

When using the bridging technique with V.A.C. VERAFLO™ Therapy on foot wounds, extra fluid is required to bridge the V.A.C. VERAT.R.A.C.™ Pad. Place the pad in an area that is LESS DEPENDENT to allow gravity to work with you in filling the foam (versus a dependent position where the fluid would have to work against gravity in order to fill the foam).

Dressing soak

For easier dressing removal and increased patient comfort, use the dressing soak tool to soak the dressing in the wound with a topical wound solution before changing the dressing. Just be sure to account for the soak volume as you would for any programmed V.A.C. VERAFLO™ Therapy cycle when managing the fluid in the bag/bottle on your input/output.

Patient comfort

Provide adequate pain relief and patient education prior to initiating therapy or changing the dressing. Position the patient in order to best accommodate pain tolerance and wound access. If additional help is needed to support patient position, have appropriate assistance available.

Maceration

Good periwound protection and appropriate instillation fluid volume should not result in maceration. Make sure you apply skin prep provided in the kit to the periwound and consider use of a barrier ring or strip to act like a “caulk” around the wound borders. If the wound bed is becoming macerated, decrease the dwell time. If it’s severe, a hydrocolloid border may help decrease maceration. Also, consider discontinuation of instillation therapy until maceration is resolved.

  • Foot wounds

    When using the bridging technique with V.A.C. VERAFLO™ Therapy on foot wounds, extra fluid is required to bridge the V.A.C. VERAT.R.A.C.™ Pad. Place the pad in an area that is LESS DEPENDENT to allow gravity to work with you in filling the foam (versus a dependent position where the fluid would have to work against gravity in order to fill the foam).

  • Dressing soak

    For easier dressing removal and increased patient comfort, use the dressing soak tool to soak the dressing in the wound with a topical wound solution before changing the dressing. Just be sure to account for the soak volume as you would for any programmed V.A.C. VERAFLO™ Therapy cycle when managing the fluid in the bag/bottle on your input/output.

  • Patient comfort

    Provide adequate pain relief and patient education prior to initiating therapy or changing the dressing. Position the patient in order to best accommodate pain tolerance and wound access. If additional help is needed to support patient position, have appropriate assistance available.

  • Maceration

    Good periwound protection and appropriate instillation fluid volume should not result in maceration. Make sure you apply skin prep provided in the kit to the periwound and consider use of a barrier ring or strip to act like a “caulk” around the wound borders. If the wound bed is becoming macerated, decrease the dwell time. If it’s severe, a hydrocolloid border may help decrease maceration. Also, consider discontinuation of instillation therapy until maceration is resolved.

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